Glock finally takes aim at the M&P C.O.R.E. line

What’s up Shooters,

Saturday night during the UFC fight, a friend and I were discussing when are we going to see Glock come out with something that will compete directly against factory products like the M&P C.O.R.E. line of pistols or FN’s FNX-45 Tactical.

Wonder no more because Kiesler Police Supply may have had a negligent discharge and announced they will have the Glock line of MOS (Mounted Optic Solution?) pistols available. The models that we know of so far are the 34, 35, 40, and 41. All are Gen 4 pistols. Pictures show they will accept popular red dots like the Trijicon RMR, Leupold DeltaPoint, and Bushnell First Strike. Hopefully, I’ll see these on display at SHOT Show.

Just Released

Just Released

Glock G34 MOS

Glock G34 MOS

Glock G35 MOS

Glock G35 MOS

Glock G41 MOS

Glock G41 MOS

Glock G40 MOS Hunter

Glock G40 MOS Hunter

I’d love to throw a ported barrel in the 34 or 35 and run it in USPSA Open Division, but sadly, because of the California DOJ’s Roster and the elimination of SSE, Californian’s will not likely see these in their local store (cue sad violin music)

It will be interesting to see how this will affect the aftermarket industry that have made a name for themselves milling out slides to mount red dots.

What do you guys think? Leave your comments below.

Kenny Wong

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10/22 Takedown Followup

What’s up Shooters,

After posting my article on the Ruger 10/22 Takedown Rifle, I received a suggestion from shooter and friend Greg F.  He suggested that I try the rifle with a magnified optic and give the gun some better ammo to see what kind of accuracy you can squeeze out of the Takedown.  He also suggested that I shoot 3 strings with 10 rounds, taking the barrel off between each string to see if there is any impact shift.  I thought “damn, that’s a great idea.”  Now if I only had a magnified optic.  There to save the day, another shooter and friend, Vince S. volunteered a 3 -12 x Tasco scope and a variety of very accurate .22 ammo.

10/22 with scope and test ammo.

10/22 with scope and test ammo.

I headed to the range with scope mounted and zeroed the rifle before testing accuracy and impact shift.  I had some Lapua Signum, and two different types of Federal ammo, Premium Gold Medal Target and just Gold Medal Target.  Because of my time and ammo constraints, I did not re-zero with each different round, so please keep that in mind and focus on group size more so than proximity to the bullseye.  The targets I used were three, six inch shoot-n-c targets set at 50 yards.

First up was the Lapua Signum.  Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to find the specs for the Signum and I don’t have a chrono to tell you how fast this round clocks in at.  I disassembled, reassembled and cycled the bolt a couple times on the Takedown between each 10 shot string.  What I noticed was that the first one or two shots were consistently low, then the group would tighten up.  The two shots you see at the two o’clock position for the bottom right target are actually from the top center target group.  Hmm… maybe the Takedown doesn’t like the Lapua?

Lapua Signum

Lapua Signum

Next up was the Federal Premium Gold Medal Target.  40 grain solid spec’d at 1200 FPS.  The first shots were low and the groups weren’t very tight, the third group being a complete throwaway.  I’m going to take the blame for the third group and say I was asleep at the trigger or something (horrendous).

Federal Premium Gold Medal Target

Federal Premium Gold Medal Target

Third and last was the Federal Gold Medal Target.  40 grain solid spec’d at 1080 FPS.  This seemed to have the best group of the three rounds tested, but I still noticed that the first shots of each group were typically the low shots of the groups.

Federal Gold Medal Target

Federal Gold Medal Target

This test really started to trouble me.  In my mind, one of the intended uses for this rifle is to be able to quickly assemble the rifle and take down small game on the first shot.  From my testing, it looks like the take down system is not capable of maintaining zero on the initial shots.  This was a big red flag considering one of it’s intended uses.  I can’t believe that Ruger didn’t catch this.  After doing some searching and going back over the users manual, I decide to tighten up the adjustment knob for the take down mechanism.  Now when I purchased the Takedown, the rifle seemed very snug when assembled.  There was not any play between the barrel and receiver so I thought I was good to go.

I returned to the range after making the adjustments and the results were much improved.  The groups were a little tighter and gone was the initial dropped shot.  Unfortunately, I didn’t get a picture of the targets with the remaining Lapua and Federal rounds, but I was able to get some ELEY club ammo and shown below is the results from it.  ELEY club is a 40 grain round nose coming in at 1085 FPS.

ELEY club

ELEY club

photo

Author during testing

Conclusions and Lessons Learned

Sometimes, it pays to read the instruction manual.  Doing so would have saved me a little frustration and coming to the wrong conclusion on the accuracy and repeatability of Ruger’s 10/22 Takedown rifle.  I wouldn’t call my testing exhaustive by any measure, but for now, I’m satisfied that the 10/22 can hold zero and would meet most people’s needs for a .22 caliber rifle that can be stored in a small format and deployed rapidly.  The best groups achieved in my testing with the Takedown were with 40 grain projectiles traveling around 1080 FPS (I believe the Lapua Signum has similar specs).

What have I learned from this experience?

  • Bring a ruler or something to measure group sizes.
  • Make sure your camera batteries are charged.
  • Don’t forget the camera.
  • Instructions are good for something.

I’d also like to thank Greg F. for the testing suggestion and Vince S. for loaning me the glass and ammo.  Without their feedback and help, this article would not have been possible.  I appreciate their support.

If you have any feedback, please leave it in the comments below and thanks for following Way of the Shooter.  See you at the range.

Kenny Wong

Ruger 10/22 Takedown

IMG_1555

What’s up Shooters,

I had a chance to play around with my 10/22 Takedown this weekend and I am really liking this rifle. I started out at 50 yards with 3, 10 round magazines. Between each magazine I would take the gun down into its two halves and reassemble to see if there were any problems with consistency.

IMG_2025

50 yards

IMG_2027

100 yards

Using the factory iron sights, I was able to manage a 3 5/8 inch group with shots landing high and a little right. I then took a new target out to 100 yards and using the same procedures managed a group just over 6 inches with the bulk of the shots landing to the right and slightly high of center. I think this is decent accuracy out of the box, not haven taken anytime to zero the rifle. Ammo used was Winchester SUPER-X 22LR Plated Hollow Point, 40gr.

Ruger 10/22 Takedown iron sights

Ruger 10/22 Takedown iron sights

The factory sights are a bead and notch setup. I’m not a fan and plan on replacing them with a set of Williams Ace In The Hole sights. The Ace In The Hole features a fiber optic front with a peep rear integrated into a scope base and is available from Shop Ruger.

Overall, I’m very happy with the Takedown.  I plan on upgrading the trigger for a lighter, crisper break and adding a red dot or low magnification optic.  My goal for the Takedown is to keep it streamline and not add too much bulk.  I feel that adding a high magnification optic might ruin the pack-ability of the Takedown.

What would you do to the Takedown if you had one?  Please let me know in the comments below.

Kenny Wong

Way of The Shooter has moved!

What’s up Shooters,

After making my initial posts on Tumblr, I realized that I wasn’t very happy with the product so taking advice from some friends, I’m moved the blog to my own domain.  All post going forward will be done on WayofTheShooter.com.  Please subscribe to the new blog via email or go to the Facebook page and like it.  This would not be possible without everyone’s feedback.  Thank you Shooters.

Kenny Wong

SHOT Show 2013: G-Code/HSP

I had a chance to check out the INCOG holster jointly developed by Haley Strategic and G-Code and it looks like a very well thought out holster.  From the angled belt clips to the addition of a spacer to push the heel of the pistol, everything is designed to push the gun closer to the body to aid in concealment.  I wasn’t able to try the holster on, but will get one soon to give it a try.

Kenny Wong

SHOT Show 2013: DEFIANCE

It was also at the KRISS booth that I then noticed the H.A.L.O H3 Adaptive Luminescent Optic sights made by DEFIANCE.  The sight is a tritium and fiber optic hybrid, but unlike any other that I’d seen up to this point.  The tritium is housed inside an aluminum cylinder which is then nested inside a fiber optic tube.  The fiber optic tube is available in either green or red and is highly visible.  I’ve been using an Ameriglo ProGlo front sight with 10-8 rear sight with good results, but would love to give the H.A.L.O. sights a run.

Kenny Wong

SHOT Show 2013: SPHINX

As I was walking past the KRISS booth, I spotted the SPHINX logo and my friend Shin had told me since I’m active in competitive shooting, I should take a look at this line of Swiss made pistols very similar to CZ.  The competition model had some serious heft to it so I can see how it would do well in USPSA Production division.  Having not shot either CZ or SPHINX, I think the comparative CZ pistol would be the CZ SP-01 (anyone having more experience with these pistols are welcome to correct me).

Kenny Wong